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Sunday, May 3, 2020 | History

2 edition of Educational aspirations and expectations of students in rural Washington high schools found in the catalog.

Educational aspirations and expectations of students in rural Washington high schools

Walter L. Slocum

Educational aspirations and expectations of students in rural Washington high schools

by Walter L. Slocum

  • 113 Want to read
  • 19 Currently reading

Published by Washington Agricultural Experiment Station, Washington State University in Pullman] .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Washington (State)
    • Subjects:
    • Student aspirations -- Washington (State),
    • Rural youth -- Washington (State)

    • Edition Notes

      Statement[by Walter L. Slocum.
      SeriesWashington Agricultural Experiment Station. Bulletin 690
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsLB1131 .S615
      The Physical Object
      Pagination23 p.
      Number of Pages23
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL5636502M
      LC Control Number68064111

      The Journal of Research in Rural Education is a peer-reviewed, open access e-journal publishing original pieces of scholarly research of demonstrable relevance to educational issues within rural settings. JRRE was established in by the University of Maine College of Education . Journal of Research in Rural Education, , 19(2) Factors Influencing College Aspirations of Rural West Virginia High School Students Erica Chenoweth and Renee V. Galliher Utah State University Portions of this paper were presented at the annual meeting of the West Virginia Psychological Association, September

      This is substantiated by a study of rural youth aspirations (Howley, Harmon, & Leopold, ) and a state study by six of the regional educational laboratories comparing aspirations of rural high school students with expectations of their parents and school staff (Ley, Nelson, & Beltyukova, ). Using data from the High School Longitudinal Study, this article examines how family factors contribute to the rural/non-rural di ff erences in college expectations in the early s. Prior studies have found that rural students have disadvantages in family economic and cultural capital and advantages in social capital when pursuing higher education, formulating the rural disadvantage.

        72 percent of the U.S. landmass is considered rural, and around 18 percent of K public school students attend a school that is classified as rural. 2 Rural students may have less access to high-speed internet, AP coursework, or extracurricular opportunities, and low-income rural students may face unique challenges related to transportation. Anne is a teenager attending junior high school in Washington, D.C. Anne attends a school where all her teachers have high expectations for student conduct. If Anne is typical of students in research conducted on this subject, we may expect Anne to have _____ compared to students in other schools. a. more adjustment problems.


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Educational aspirations and expectations of students in rural Washington high schools by Walter L. Slocum Download PDF EPUB FB2

Previous research studies were reviewed, and hypotheses relating to educational aspiration and occupational choice were developed. Information on educational aspirations and expectations was then obtained from a random sample of students enrolled in in 30 rural Washington high schools.

Farm versus non-farm student differences were examined with respect to social, economic, Cited by: 4. EDUCATIONAL ASPIRATIONS AND EXPECTATIONS OF STUDENTS IN RURAL WASHINGTON HIGH SCHOOLS.

WALTER L. SLOCUM. INTRODUCTION. This report presents information obtained from students. who were enrolled in as sophomores, juniors and seniors in a random sample of 30 rural Washington high. schools. The basic source of information was a questionnaire.

sophomores, juniors, and seniors in 30 rural high schools by the Department of Rural Sociology at Washington State University were presented in this report. A principal objective of the research project was to ascertain the nature and extent of influence of school factors on educational and occupational aspirations and expectations.

Thirty-twopercent of rural students see themselves going to work full-timethe first year after high school compared to 24%urban and 22%ofthe suburbanstudents. Conversely, more urban and suburban students than rural (43%, 44%, and 32% respectively, see themselves going on to a four year college).

Thus, rural Appalachian students who often perceive family members as role models may set outcome expectations accordingly; a student may choose to remain close to home and go to work directly. The study shows that students with either high aspirations or high expectations have higher school achievement than those with both low aspirations and low expectations.

Furthermore, complete alignment between high aspirations, high expectations and high achievement is the most important predictor of future educational behaviour among by: Educational and occupational aspirations of rural high school seniors in the private and public schools in northwest Iowa Duane Harold Bajema Iowa State University Follow this and additional works at: Part of theAgricultural Education Commons,Other Education Commons,Religion Commons, and theSociology of Culture CommonsAuthor: Duane Harold Bajema.

Research question 1 used the full sample of 10, grade 10 students in who reported their postsecondary education expectations (2, students in the REL Midwest region and 8, in the rest of the nation).

Twenty-ive percent of these stu­ dents were in rural schools, and the rest were in nonrural Size: KB. A third circumstance that influences the aspirations of rural students is the education level of parents. Here, too, rural students suffer an early disadvantage. Seniors attending schools in metropolitan areas are times more likely to have a parent with at least a bachelor's degree than non-metropolitan students (Pollard & O'Hare, ).Cited by: cap ital and educational aspirations of rural youth, using data from a recent national survey of.

rural high school students (N = 5,). Obtaining such large-scale data on the rural youth. This banner text can have markup.

web; books; video; audio; software; images; Toggle navigation. An extended body of research has documented the outmigration of the “best and brightest” youth from rural areas.

Some of this scholarship has suggested that rural schools and educators may be complicit in this process as they devote extra attention and resources to the highest achieving students—those most likely to leave their rural communities after high by: McCulloh states parents of rural students are the key influencers in whether or not a rural student decides to pursue higher education and where.

Tori Streich, a senior at the University of Central Arkansas and originally from northeastern Iowa, had to overcome her parents’ expectations. This study was designed to study adolescents' educational aspirations with a particular focus on different educational tracks.

A better understanding of the background of educational aspirations might help to tailor more effective intervention programs aimed at enhancing success in the educational system, and consequently increasing chances in the job by: Educational Opportunities in Washington's High Schools Under State Education Reform: High School Responses to Expectations for Change VOLUME 2 FINAL REPORT Barbara McLain and Madeleine Thompson September Washington State Institute for Public Policy East Fifth Avenue, Suite Post Office Box Olympia, WA Teachers' educational expectations for the student were based on the teachers' response to the question of how far in school they thought each student would go.

Original responses given were the same as those for the measure of students' educational aspirations and were transformed into years of schooling (e.g., 1 = 11, 7 = 22).Cited by: The purpose of this study was to examine the relation of several individual and contextual difference factors to the perceived educational barriers of rural youth.

Data were from a broader national investigation of students’ postsecondary aspirations and preparation in rural high schools Cited by: Postsecondary education expectations and attainment of rural and nonrural students.

This study examined rural–nonrural differences in postsecondary educational expectations and the attainment of expectations for grade 10 students attending rural and nonrural high schools in the Regional Educational Laboratory (REL) Midwest region and how these differences compare with rural.

This paper reviews the research literature on the relationship between parental involvement (PI) and academic achievement, with special focus on the secondary school (middle and high school) level.

The results first present how individual PI variables correlate with academic achievement and then move to more complex analyses of multiple variables on the general construct described in the Cited by: As economic forces shift in rural areas, how can creating expanded educational opportunities in science, technology, engineering, and math make a difference for rural students.

Guest Blogger Barbara Peterson answers the question in a post based on an article she coauthored in the May issue of the Peabody Journal of Education, edited by Education Northwest.

Rural Students in Washington State: STEM as a Strategy for Building Rigor, Postsecondary Aspirations, and Relevant Career Opportunities Peabody Journal of Education: Issues in International Education, Vol.

90, No. 2. Barbara Peterson, Greta Bornemann, Cheryl Lydon, & Kimberly West – University of Washington. ABSTRACT.Author: Toni Haas; ERIC Clearinghouse on Rural Education and Small Schools: Publisher: Charleston, West Virginia: ERIC Clearinghouse on Rural Education and Small Schools, [] Series: ERIC digest (Las Cruces, N.M.), EDO-RC Edition/Format.Ardoin's text explores how a working class, rural environment influences students’ opportunities to pursue higher education and engage in the college choice process.

Based on accounts from rural high school students and counselors, this book examines perceptions of higher education and what challenges arise for both rural students and counselors.